planeshots:

Formation flight Sunday. “Curtiss C-46 in flight (S/N 41-5159), the first C-46 built, and Curtiss P-40F (S/N 41-13997). (U.S. Air Force photo) “

planeshots:

Formation flight Sunday. “Curtiss C-46 in flight (S/N 41-5159), the first C-46 built, and Curtiss P-40F (S/N 41-13997). (U.S. Air Force photo) “

ourpresidents:

Veterans Day Spotlight: Harry S. Truman
Harry Truman’s aspirations for a military career began back in high school, where he had hopes of attending West Point or Annapolis upon graduation in 1901. Although his poor eyesight prevented him from qualifying for admission, Truman did not entirely give up on a military career.
Four years after graduation, Harry S. Truman joined Battery “B” of the Missouri National Guard. The Guard had created Battery “B” in Kansas City as an addition to the already established Battery “A” in St. Louis. This time, Truman didn’t take any chances and memorized the eye chart. He became a private in Light Artillery Battery “B,” First Brigade on June 14, 1905.
Harry Truman left military service 37 years later as a Colonel in the U.S. Army Officers’ Reserve Corps.
To learn more about President Truman’s military career:
Speech given to National Guard Association
Truman’s Life and Times: Military Service
Photo: Harry S. Truman in is World War I Army uniform.  First Lieutenant, Battery D 129th Field Artillery.  1914-1918.
-from the Truman Library

ourpresidents:

Veterans Day Spotlight: Harry S. Truman

Harry Truman’s aspirations for a military career began back in high school, where he had hopes of attending West Point or Annapolis upon graduation in 1901. Although his poor eyesight prevented him from qualifying for admission, Truman did not entirely give up on a military career.

Four years after graduation, Harry S. Truman joined Battery “B” of the Missouri National Guard. The Guard had created Battery “B” in Kansas City as an addition to the already established Battery “A” in St. Louis. This time, Truman didn’t take any chances and memorized the eye chart. He became a private in Light Artillery Battery “B,” First Brigade on June 14, 1905.

Harry Truman left military service 37 years later as a Colonel in the U.S. Army Officers’ Reserve Corps.

To learn more about President Truman’s military career:

Photo: Harry S. Truman in is World War I Army uniform.  First Lieutenant, Battery D 129th Field Artillery.  1914-1918.

-from the Truman Library

rogerwilkerson:

Lunch Counter, art by John Falter.  Detail from October 12, 1946 Saturday Evening Post cover.

rogerwilkerson:

Lunch Counter, art by John Falter.  Detail from October 12, 1946 Saturday Evening Post cover.

ourpresidents:

Harry S. Truman’s World War I Service Pin
Here’s one of the earliest official portraits taken of Harry S. Truman once he became President of the United States. Notice his World War I service pin, which he almost always wore.
-from the Truman Library

ourpresidents:

Harry S. Truman’s World War I Service Pin

Here’s one of the earliest official portraits taken of Harry S. Truman once he became President of the United States. Notice his World War I service pin, which he almost always wore.

-from the Truman Library

indypendent-thinking:

Beached Disneyland Mermaids … Occupational Hazards,1967

indypendent-thinking:

Beached Disneyland Mermaids … Occupational Hazards,1967

(via fuckyeahvintage-retro)

youngpeopleinloveareneverhungry:

Jimmy and Donna dancing I guess… :)

youngpeopleinloveareneverhungry:

Jimmy and Donna dancing I guess… :)

vintascope:

J. C. Leyendecker Cover - 19370703 Post on Flickr.
Happy Independence Day!

vintascope:

J. C. Leyendecker Cover - 19370703 Post on Flickr.

Happy Independence Day!

uspsstamps:

It’s Flag Day! On this day in 1777 the Second Continental Congress established the first official American flag. The familiar version of Old Glory that we know today (50 stars) was established in 1960. USPS is very proud of all the stamps issued over the years featuring our beloved Stars and Stripes. Here are just a few of our favorites. 

uspsstamps:

It’s Flag Day! On this day in 1777 the Second Continental Congress established the first official American flag. The familiar version of Old Glory that we know today (50 stars) was established in 1960. USPS is very proud of all the stamps issued over the years featuring our beloved Stars and Stripes. Here are just a few of our favorites.